Bridget White Anglo-Indian Recipe Books

Bridget White Anglo-Indian Recipe Books
ANGLO-INDIAN RECIPE BOOKS

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All the recipes and Photographs on this Site are old Family Recipes and tried and tested by the Author. Please feel free to try out these old recipes, and relish them, but desist from copying and using on other sites without the prior permission of Bridget White-Kumar. Any infringement would amount to Plagiarism and infringement of Copy Right punishable by Law

ANGLO-INDIAN COOKERY BOOKS

ANGLO-INDIAN COOKERY BOOKS
For copies contact: Bridget Kumar Tel: +9198455 71254 Email: bidkumar@gmail.com / bridgetkumar@yahoo.com A whole set of the 6 books mentioned above costs as under: (includes the Postage and handling) 1. Within India Rs. 1800.00 (Payment through Cheque or Bank Trnasfer) 2. Outside India: Australia: A$ 125.00, Canada C$ 130.00, UK: GBP 75.00, USA: $130.00 (Payment through Western Union or PayPal) ALSO AVAILABLE ON AMAZON.IN & FLIPKART

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Friday, June 20, 2014

SIMPLE EGG DELICACIES

‘SIMPLE EGG DELICACIES’ is a collection of simple and easy recipes of delectable Egg Dishes for Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner and for all other times as well.  The selection covers a wide selection of Breakfast Egg Dishes, Mouth watering Curries, Egg Salads, Tasty Tea Time Snacks and Treats, Sandwiches, Casseroles and Baked Dishes. In addition to the recipes, ‘Some handy hints on how to store and preserve Eggs’, ‘A few  Quick Serving ideas using Eggs’, besides some useful tips and tricks on how to prepare a variety of fluffy and soft Omelettes and the names and description of the various Egg Dishes are also given.
I decided to bring out a Recipe Book on exclusive Egg Recipes since I found that many people who are vegetarians do include Eggs in their diet. This Book ‘SIMPLE EGG DELICACIES’ is a real treasure for ‘Eggetarians’ as there are recipes for a variety of egg dishes under different categories. The recipes are mostly Anglo-Indian but I've also included some tasty Indian Egg curries and some universal all time favourites such as Eggs Benedict, Egg Florentine, One Eyed Jack, Coddled Eggs, Shirred Eggs, Egg Frittata, Egg Quiche, Egg Custard, Eggs Mornay, Egg and Sausage Casserole, Scotch Eggs, Devilled Eggs, the Classic Egg Salad, French Toast Casserole, etc.  The recipes are very easy to follow and only easily available ingredients are made use of.
 Price per Book:  India : Rs.130.00, Australia: A$10.00, UAE: Rs 300.00, Canada C$10.00, UK: GBP 5.00, USA: $10.00
To buy a copy contact Bridget Kumar on :+919845571254 or 08025504137. Email bridgetkumar@yahoo.com

Friday, June 6, 2014

ANGLO-INDIAN SATURDAY LUNCH - Yellow Coconut Rice, Mince Ball Curry (Bad Word Curry) and Devil Chutney


ANGLO-INDIAN SATURDAY LUNCH - Yellow Coconut Rice, Mince Ball Curry (Bad Word Curry) and Devil Chutney
Some Childhood Memories of KGF
My mum was an exceptional cook, whose even ordinary dishes tasted delicious. She was versatile and imaginative when it came to cooking. She would improvise and turn out the most delicious curries and side dishes with whatever ingredients were on hand. My mum had a procedure for everything. The onions had to be thinly sliced and the green chillies and coriander leaves chopped finely. Even the tomatoes for the curry were scalded first and the skin removed, then chopped into bits and strained through a sieve, so that only the pulp was used and the seeds and skin thrown away!
Our Ayah would grind all the curry stuff (masalas) on the grinding stone that was required for the curry every day, as in those days everything was prepared fresh and from scratch. The readymade curry powders were avoided as much as possible. Moreover, since all the ingredients such as the meat, chicken, vegetables, etc., were bought fresh every day, the dishes cooked with them were extremely tasty. Since we had no gas or kerosene stoves at that time, every single dish was cooked over a fire wood oven, which just added to the wonderful taste!
Lunches on Saturdays and Sundays were special. Saturday lunch was invariably Mince Ball Curry, Coconut Rice and Devil Chutney. My mind still relishes the taste of the Mince ball curry and Coconut Rice that my mum prepared. On Saturdays we had only half-day school, so we were back home by 12.30 PM ravenously hungry. And we’d be assailed by the delicious aroma of the Coconut Rice and the Tasty Mince Ball curry even before we reached our gate. 


The mince for the Ball Curry, had to be just right. So the meat (either beef or mutton) was brought home fresh from the Butcher Shop, cut into pieces, washed and then minced at home. (The mince for the famous Anglo-Indian Cutlets, Croquettes, Patties, etc was prepared in this way as well).
Like every Anglo-Indian family, we had our own meat-mincing machine, which was fixed to the kitchen table. We children loved helping my mum to mince the meat, whenever we had holidays, on the days we needed minced meat for various preparations.  We would fight to take turns to mince the meat especially for the Ball Curry. We found it quite thrilling and exciting to help my mum by putting in pieces of meat in the mincer and then see it come out like little worms through the cutters while turning the handle around! We were always amazed that the meat that we helped to mince would eventually transform into our beloved Mince Ball curry.
The Yellow Coconut Rice was always prepared with freshly squeezed coconut milk and butter. Like the meat mincer, the Coconut Scraper, fixed firmly on the other side of the Kitchen worktable was another important appendage of every Anglo-Indian Kitchen.



Sometimes, two fresh coconuts would be broken and then scraped or grated. The scraped/grated coconut had to be soaked in hot water and the thick milk extracted. For every cup of rice double the quantity of coconut milk was the right proportion; a little more would make the rice ‘pish pash’ or over cooked, and a little less would mean that the rice wouldn’t be cooked well. So very accurate measurements were required. The raw rice and coconut milk would then be simmered with ghee or butter, saffron or turmeric and a few whole spices of cinnamon, cardamom and cloves till the rice was cooked perfectly. This coconut rice formed the fragrant yet light base of our Saturday Special Anglo-Indian meal. The Yellow Coconut Rice and Mince Ball Curry (also known as Bad Word Curry) was always accompanied with a typical Anglo-Indian Sauce or Relish known as Devil Chutney.  Devil Chutney is a fiery red chutney or sauce. Its bright red colour often misleads people to think that is a very pungent and spicy dish. It is actually a sweet and sour sauce, and only slightly pungent. The vinegar and sugar used in its preparation react with the onion and red chilli to produce the bright red colour. Devil Chutney is also known as “Hell fire or Hell’s flame chutney or Fiery Mother-in-law’s Tongue Chutney” due to its vivid colour.
I would now like to share my mum’s recipes for these three special dishes. They are very easy to prepare. I have adapted her recipe to suit present day available ingredients and masala powders. The recipes are from my book ANGLO-INDIAN CUISINE – A LEGACY OF FLAVOURS FROM THE PAST.























YELLOW COCONUT RICE   
Serves 6   Preparation Time 45 minutes
Ingredients
1 pack of coconut milk diluted with water to get 4 cups of milk or 1 fresh coconut grated and milk extracted to get 4 cups of diluted milk
2 cups of Raw Rice or Basmati Rice
½  teaspoon turmeric powder or a few strands of saffron
Salt to taste
4 tablespoons butter or ghee
3 cloves, 3 cardamoms, 3 small sticks of cinnamon
Heat ghee in a large vessel or Rice cooker and fry the spices for a few minutes. Add the washed rice, salt, turmeric and 4 cups of coconut milk and cook till the rice is done.
Coconut Rice is best served with Ball Curry or Chicken curry and Devil Chutney.
ANGLO-INDIAN MINCE BALL CURRY (BAD WORD CURRY)
(Mince Koftas in a coconut based gravy)
Serves 6    Preparation time 45 minutes
Ingredients for the Curry
3 large onions chopped
1 sprig curry leaves
3 teaspoons chilli powder
1 teaspoon coriander powder
3 teaspoons ginger garlic paste
3 big tomatoes pureed or chopped finely
½ cup ground coconut paste
1 teaspoon spice powder or garam masala
Salt to taste
3 tablespoons oil
1 teaspoon coriander leaves chopped finely for garnishing
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
Ingredients for the Mince Balls (Koftas)
½ kg minced meat beef or mutton (fine mince)
½ teaspoon spice powder or garam masala powder
3 green chilies chopped
A small bunch of coriander leaves chopped finely
Salt to taste
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
How to make the Ball Curry
1. Heat oil in a large pan and fry the onions till golden brown.
2. Add the ginger garlic paste and the curry leaves and fry for some time.
3. Now add the chili powder, coriander powder, spice powder or garam masala powder, turmeric powder and coconut, and fry for a few minutes till the oil separates from the mixture.
4. Next add the tomato puree and salt and simmer for some time. Add sufficient water and bring to boil.
5. In the meanwhile mix the spice powder, salt, chopped green chilies, turmeric powder and coriander leaves with the mince and form into small balls.
6. When the curry is boiling slowly, drop in the mince balls carefully one by one.
7. Simmer on slow heat for 20 minutes till the balls are cooked and the gravy is not too thick.
Serve hot with Coconut Rice and Devil Chutney.

 DEVIL CHUTNEY (HELL’S FLAME CHUTNEY)
Ingredients
2 medium size onions chopped roughly
1/2 teaspoon red chilli powder or 1 or 2 dry red chillies
1 tablespoon raisins (optional)
2 teaspoons sugar
A pinch of salt
2 tablespoons vinegar
Grind all the above ingredients together till smooth. If chutney is too thick, add a little more vinegar.
Serve with Coconut Rice and Mince Ball Curry

This is writeup is from my book KOLAR GOLD FIELDS DOWN MEMORY LANE
http://memoriesofkgf.blogspot.com








Tuesday, June 3, 2014

ANGLO-INDIAN DELICACIES - BRIDGET WHITE

ANGLO-INDIAN DELICACIES - BRIDGET WHITE
The new revised version of my book ANGLO-INDIAN DELICACIES published by Partridge India is available for sale on Flipkart. This is the link http://www.flipkart.com/anglo-indian-delicacies/p/itmduzy57yhzhkkh?pid=9781482801378&otracker=from-search&srno=t_1&query=Anglo-Indian+Delicacies&ref=2082e707-1a15-4bef-abe5-8a0424c93a82
'ANGLO-INDIAN DELICACIES' is an interesting assortment of easy- to- follow Recipes of popular vintage and contemporary Cuisine of Colonial Anglo India. It covers a wide spectrum, of recipes ranging from  mouth watering Gravies and Curries, Pepper Water and Fries, Roasts and Steaks to tasty Pulaos and Pickles, Savouries, Sweets and Christmas treats,. A few home brewed wines are also included to round off the extensive flavours and tastes.
In this book I’ve endeavoured to cover some of the old typical dishes that were popular in Calcutta, and other parts of Bengal besides Central and Eastern India. Dishes such as Pork Bhooni, Chicken / Meat Jal Frezie, Devil Pork Curry, Calcutta Cutlets (Kobhiraji Cutlet), Fish Kedegeree, Double Onions Meat Curry (Do Piaza), Meat Glassey (Glazzie ) or Fruity meat Curry, Meat and Spinach Curry, Duck Dumpoke, etc, are some of the old favourites featured here. I’ve also included some recipes for dishes that were popular during World War II and were served in the Army camps and Officer’s Mess, such as the Army Camp Soup, Brown Windsor Soup, The Bengal Lancers Shrimp Curry, Veal Country Captain (Cold Meat Curry), Bubble and Squeak, One Eyed Jack, Colonel Sandhurst’s Beef Curry, Salted Tongue, Salted Beef, Corned Beef, Kalkals, Rose Cookies, Dhol Dhol, BeefPanthras, Potato Chops etc. All these dishes have been given a new lease of life, besides a host of other assorted dishes and preparations.
The new revised version of ANGLO-INDIAN DELICACIES has lots of new recipes in this edition. The groupings this time are: Soups and Pepper Water, Curries, Gravies, Fries, Side Dishes and More (which include  Chicken and Poultry; Meat – beef, lamb and mutton; Pork, Fish, Prawns, Crabs and Eggs)  Vegetarian Variety, Rice dishes, Anglo-Indian pickles and chutneys, Savaouries, Sweets and Festive Treats, Homemade Wines and some Basic Curry Powders.
The recipes in this book are simple and easy to follow and only easily available ingredients have been suggested. The easy-to-follow directions for preparing these old, popular, sumptuous dishes make cooking simple, enjoyable and problem-free. The pungency of the dishes can be reduced according to individual taste by reducing the amount of chillie powder, spices or pepper powder suggested in each recipe. All the recipes in this Book are for 6 generous servings. If cooking for a smaller or larger number, the quantities should be adjusted accordingly.
The word “Everlasting” means ‘something, that once created, endures through time and never ceases to exist’. Anglo-Indian Cuisine is “EVERLASTING” and will endure forever and ever.

 

 

Bridget White